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democrats to vote in favor of it. it marks the second time now that house speaker john boehner has broken his own rule, the boehner rule, model on the hastert rule. said the speaker would not bring any bill to the floor for a vote that does not have the support of a majority of his conference, a majority of the majority, it's known as. but last night, just about 20% of the republican conference voted for the bill. the vote split the leadership, majority leader eric cantor, majority whip mccarthy voted for the bill. boehner first broke his rule on new year's day when he allowed a vote to avert the fiscal cliff on taxes. apparently there's an addendum to the boehner rule. the majority of the majority, unless the country is on the verge of a tax crisis, or chris christie has access the to a megaphone. christie made sure this week that republicans knew he would use it. >> and i'll say again, new jersey does not expect anything more than what was done for louisiana and alabama and mississippi and if they want to make new rules about disasters, they picked the wrong state to make the new rules
of relationship with john boehner, say, where we can feel optimistic that they're going to have a very different kind of relationship but can actually be more effective? >> i think there's a different kind of dynamic that speaker boehner has to deal with. i don't know him personally, but his reputation is that he can get deals done, but then he has to sell them in a caucus, some whom, a minority, but a vocal minority of whom are very rigid indeed. so i think the speaker has an opportunity to show his more magnanimous leadership and to lead the whole of the house, and not just his caucus. and as he does that, i think his relationship, not just with the president, but with the general public will improve, and i hope it does. >> one of the issues he's going to face is gun crime, gun control, gun violence, generally. he's been generally audacious in terms of the proposals he's put forward. there's a reality check within minutes of him doing so. people have been queuing up from both sides of the senate and saying look, he may want an assault weapons ban but he's not going to get one. lom like the whi
. but his view-- particularly on john boehner-- is that boehner cannot deliver a deal. he can do all the schmoozing he wants but when john boehner, the house speaker, goes back to his caucus they are driven and ruled by imperatives that are impervious to schmoozing and this that's basically their nstituents at home and therefore if boehner can't help him make a deal he has to find some other kind of leverage and that comes from the outside which is why in the inaugural address today the president talked about voters and said we have to do it not through our votes but our voices that's why he's organizing america for action, to try and build pressure from the outside that will somehow work on lawmakers. he's tried that before but they're recommitted it-to-it now that's given up on dealing with congress directly. >> if you took the 2001 most influeial peop in washington 2000 of them if you them in a room and ask them to chat about the topics, the president's lack of willingness to reach out to congress very much, his lack of feel for the importance of relationships, 2,000 of the people
boehner, is putting forward a proposal that increases the debt limit without an equal amount of spending cuts. that was his long-held position a and he is abandoning that position, and saying that he will increase the debt ceiling for a period of three months and in that timeframe, the congress has to come up with a budget and that is a win from the democrats standpoint, but they do not like the idea of increasing the debt limit in increments. the question is, if it gets passed will it force both sides to come to the table on spending cuts within a matter of months when they take on the issue on of the budget and then of course, the sequester. that is the big question mark, you heard nancy pelosi saying she does not like the idea and i have spoke to republicans that do not like the idea of withholding their pay if they do not get a budget passed. peter king of new york said it's like bribery. so, while aides on the hill are saying they feel confident that this package package will make it through both chambers, we've to wait to see how it plays out. it's a victory on the democrat's stand
. he kind of cleaned john boehner squat in terms of taxes and revenues. it was all tax increases. $15 million in spending cuts. republicans have to get their acts together to negotiate better on the debt ceiling and other things. neil: what is the overture on the republican party? saying that they are going to push for a three-month extension? >> sure, what i read in it was from a pr standpoint in saying that gets all is a bad idea and will hurt the economy. and for economy a year and a half ago. republicans are saying that maybe it's a smart move in the sense that they want to say enough of this pr stunt. let's take the falls off the table but let's get to the real essence of spending cuts. the president is going to keep coming back. but it's more revenue. but it's more tax increases. we knew that in the campaign. neil: there is this paraphrase between the rich and the poor that you alluded to. maybe he has not done this. >> i don't think he is done on more tax increases. neil: more deductions? >> deductions and perhaps more rate hikes. this was alluded to during the fiscal cliff tal
alexander, the wife of senator lamar alexander. and by debby boehner, wife of house speaker john boehner. sorry to interrupt you there. >> more recently, you may disagree with the content and the tone but no one will dispute the fact that george w. bush was aiming for the bleachers with his second inaugural with what he called his freedom speech which is -- in terms of projecting american force, moral and military around the world in the wake of 9/11 and the doctrine of preemptive military action. >> you knows the reference to lincoln, we talk about being in a divided america now. in many ways we are politically. but you think about lincoln and that inauguration, both of his, it was a different level. >> different level all together. he is involved in the conflict where half a million people would be killed, the end of channeled slavery. a lot is at stake. we're fighting now but not anywhere like that, thank god. >> we're about to see the introduction of the first lady of the united states, michelle obama. as you watched her grow in this role the last four years, what do you think? >> we
was somehow detected as class welfare, targeting the wealthy for more taxes. speaker of the house boehner states that the president backed away from an agreed compromise on raising the debt limit. in an article in "the new york times" magazine tends to support that charge. and a recent book by bob woodward paints a picture of obama standing firm against john boehner and the negotiations. as the apparent requirement for resolution of major legislation approaches, and as it appears that even more rigid positions are being forecast for the next congress, it will take an unusually skillful second term president to deliver solutions to the financial problems facing the nation. if the task rests on the shoulders of barack obama, wilson would not compromise or will he be like eisenhower, reagan, clinton, and even washington to figure how to win against the odds. of course, to achieve the accommodation with congress, he would need a lyndon johnson, tip o'neill, a newt gingrich to leave the congress majority that would follow. so what specifically would i recommend obama do to attempt to avoid the
-of-living adjustments. john boehner and republicans decided they want to have an argument over the debt ceiling, because of the new year we will be better positioned. they quickly have realized that is not going to be the lever they thought it would be. host: you have covered three presidents, clinton, bush, and now president obama. people say the political divide between these branches is stronger now than it has been in years. you agree or disagree? guest: i absolutely agree. host: why/ guest: i think it is a building that has been taking place frankly since the past couple administrations. it was the war in iraq. for the republicans, the government spending. it is also the election system and the way we run our primaries. we have a more ideological- purified house of representatives than we have had in a very long time. that is because some people would argue redistricting, as well, which in the past election both parties to it. in the states where democrats are not in control they redraw the districts to make the majority democrats. the republican side as well. this is the first time republicans hav
are they able to bring the economy down. will john boehner at the end of the day have to do what he did with the tax bill, which is basically cede control of the house more or less to the democrats and have most of his party vote against something but allow a vote to come up that will let democrats and nancy pelosi yet again rescue the day. >> okay, jared. i want to play you something the president said on monday. you referenced it yourself. take a listen. >> they will not collect or ransom an exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. >> jared, i put it to you, do they not realize this fight isn't just hurting the economy. it's also helping this president look like the only grown-up in washington. >> i don't think they're calculus on this stuff is as rational as your question suggests, of course. but, again, if you actually get out of this beltway, and i try to do it as much as possible, and talk to people, the question i consistently get is why doesn't washington really care about the problems that we fac
bickering gets put aside. do these guys like each other or do they not like each other? mr. boehner said something rather strong about harry reid. we assume that kind of language was not used in the white house this morning, but can they really get along and do what needs to get done? >> there is -- there are pockets of enmity that are quite well-known. what's really wonderful about washington, and this day is going to be full of this, is that you can have members, particularly on the senate floor, that can just bash each other. john has had a bird's-eye view of this. during the day with key issues of state at risk, and at the end of the day they can go off to the moncle and have a drink or a steak and so -- >> although a lot less than used to take place. >> that's true. >> jill biden, the vice president's wife, the second lady of the united states, begins her way down to the podium. >> i think there is more partisanship about to break out. >> call it bipartisanship. >> maybe i'm caught up in the spirit of the day. >> explain. >> i'll explain. >> and where do you see that? >> i have some
in the capitol the president, speaker john boehner, majority leader harry reid and a few others. you can imagine what the atmosphere will be like given a lot of words that have flown back and work, particularly between speaker boehner and majority leader reed. for a little more insight on all this, i contacted andy card, president george bush's first white house chief of staff. he was here the day of the inauguration back in 2001 and told me he expects there may be a bit of a similar atmosphere to that of 12 years ago. here's what he told me. >> i suspect it will probably be a lot like the atmosphere that george w. bush experienced in his first term of office. it was a little bit chilly and cold, but at the same time, you can't help but be wrapped up in the excitement of an inauguration. >> andy card also told me he was one of those republicans, although he didn't support president obama, he was very excited for historic reasons about his inauguration back in 2009. i have spoken to a number of republicans over the past few days about the excitement of the inauguration. they all said they will be
% of americans approve of the job he's doing as president. only 26% approve of the republican party. john boehner has an 18% approval rating. the tea party, 9% approval rating. this is a movement, this is a party in retreat and that's why the president did what he did yesterday. >> let's look at that. best case scenario would be to have two strong parties and a great national conversation and great sense of balance. i understand how you could read the speech as i won, ha-ha, and also, could be seen as this is what the country is telling me. how do we get the other points of view in there. maybe perhaps -- this is the hard part, extract what i think is dying and what i think you think is dying, that is the extremist part of that. >> the extreme part of the republican party is in retreat and just as bill buckley chased john birchers out of the conservative movement in the 1960s, so, too, will these extremists be chased out of the mainstream of the republican party. they will evolve or they will die. it's that simple. i'm not so sure the president can say, katty kay, this is what the american people
boehners and the mitch mcconnells and say in the search for common ground, i hear what you guys are saying? >> look, i think the whole theme of this speech was that throughout our history we've had very, very significant differences and we've been able to work through those differences and of course, you know, you're a student of history, now we've gone through more significant eras of dissent and disagreement than this. his point was we can come together. the point on absolutism though, is we can't come together if we are unyielding and unbending in our points of view. >> why so little talk about jobs and the economy? >> well, i think if you looked at the opening passages of the president's speech he talked about building an economy in which opportunity abounds, in which people can get ahead. that's the fundamental question and obviously jobs is a -- is an essential issue for our country, but also, building an economy which those jobs pay and which people can get ahead, that's fundamental. i mean, we have a state of the union speech this three weeks in which he'll have an opportunity to l
he talked about. he wants the leaders to lead the party. you think about speaker boehner, when he publicly says i can't corral, i can't stop the birthers from talking the way they talk, that's just their opinion. and you hear people like john sununu, who i thought was a heavyweight republican for years, using terms -- why doesn't the president learn how to be an american? it's not just the one line, it's lots of lines. >> you're absolutely right because the leadership of the republican party as most people see it is the leadership in congress. it's john boehner and mitch mcconnell -- >> and priebus. >> and reince priebus, and if those people aren't realizing the demographic realities, aren't realizing that the party has to be a big tent party if it's ever going to win national elections again, then where goeth the gop? >> let me tell you -- you're laughing -- the weird thing is you're turning off black votes if people vote, but you're also turning out the electorate, alex. the giddy part of this is, as you once said a long time ago, frank rizzo in philly, who wasn't too popular am
area have been waiting for this money. speaker boehner has said it will make it the priority in the next congress. what is the likelihood that it's going to pass? >> reporter: it's very likely that the full $51 billion left on the table will pass by the end of the day, pass the house and go to the president's desk. they have passed 17 of it and the rest will likely come later. there is a but. this is not happening without a pretty significant protest vote that happened a short while ago. a republican amendment that would have offset the spending, $17 billion of the spending with across the board spending cuts. these are pretty steep cuts. if you talk about 17 billion, that's almost the entire agriculture department alone in a year. it really is significant in telling, in the feeling among republicans and it really does illustrate why we are going to have the big fights over the next couple of months to raise the debt ceiling and two-thirds of the republican caucuses voted for this. they want to send a message that they really, really needed it, that they want to cut spending
boehner when he was up for re-election. he is still speaker. what is your advice to him what his strategy should be to deal with the president and actually also get anything done? >> i think if they want to go with a clean debt ceiling race, he has to mike a final resolution. the public, not the republicans, the public wants spending cuts. he needs to go along with sequestration and find ways to cut government, shows that republicans are doing anything. boehner is a survivor, not really a leader. >> we'll have more after this break on the two presidents. what are the president's biggest challenges he faces going into this second term? stay with us. at 1:45, the aflac duck was brought in with multiple lacerations to the wing and a fractured beak. surgery was successful, but he will be in a cast until it is fully healed, possibly several months. so, if the duck isn't able to work, how will he pay for his living expenses? aflac. like his rent and car payments? aflac. what about gas and groceries? aflac. cell phone? aflac, but i doubt he'll be using his phone for quite a while cause like i sa
at john boehner who went with proposals and guessed at what we wanted. i wish we had clinton back, too. >> everybody loves clinton now, too. >> congressman, what did you do in dealing with a president that we will say is obstinate. >> i think the republicans have to draw a hard line in the sand and use whatever means that are possible. i think when he does unstugal things we have to call him on it . representative tockman showed he has the guts to stand up and be count i will, too. i will try to get the president that this document means something. this is the u.s. constitution. i implore him to go back and read arcticle one and two and talking about the powers of the congress and president. he believes that he can run things through fiat. he another thing comings. he will face the guys likeman and i and we'll draw lines and we'll go through another government shut down to help him understand we are serious about getting the crisis under control and paying as you go and paying like every business and american has to do, we'll do it. >> congressman, do you have to worry about the public
. >> john: a few moments ago, speaker of the house john boehner entered, the most tan man in washington, d.c. in january. john mccain. >> jennifer: john mccain talking with dianne feinstein, i'm sure about gun control. cutting a deal right there. >> john: it is rather unseasonably warm today. i'm thankful for that for the folks who are there. >> jennifer: tammy baldwin. >> john: yesterday i was shocked at how warm it was. a lot of folks were expressing confusion as to why the president was sworn in yesterday. the constitution requires, of course, the president be sworn in on january 20th. since federal buildings and courthouses are closed on sunday, the ceremony is still scheduled for today on the 21st which happens to be dr. king's holiday. the president's second term officially began at 12:00 noon eastern time yesterday. >> led by kevin mccarthy. >> jennifer: john dingell. god bless him. longest serving member of congress. over 50 years. his father served in congress, too. he has it in his blood. >> john: this is like the oscars for political. >> macy's day parade coverage. instead of bl
boehner, eric cantor, the number two republican in the house, and mitch mcconnell, the republican leader in the senate, are at the white house right now having coffee with the president. do you think that there really is a chance that there can be some sort of a get together, bipartisan effort, something we haven't seen thus far? >> you know, not on everything, bob, but on some things for sure. not just because people are becoming enlightened, but because of their self-interest. if you look at your own polling and the polling that we have seen in the last few days, the republican party is trading at record lows. the congress at almost record lows. the strategy of obstruction has not been worked well for the republican party. that's why i think you saw them retreat from the plan to push this debt ceiling issue immediately upon returning to work. so i think that there's a prospect for getting some things done. certainly on issues like immigration reform. there's a powerful impetus for there to be progress. i think we can make some. >> david, thank you very much. you're going to be leaving
boehner, the republican majority leader, eric cantor. the people that he will be doing battle with, just after this is done. but this is the moment for unity. and talking to the president's aides about what he hopes to convey in this speech, he will acknowledge the deep divisions, the deep political divisions, that dominated so much of his first term. he'll talk about, despite those divisions, we have to come together to do what we can. >> i'm looking at the scene now, we all are together, as the president comes out of church. we see sasha with him, who yesterday told him, he didn't mess up. at the other -- malia will be coming in soon. i think we're all struck at the difference in four years, as we look at them. and remembering that four years ago, at this moment, the president had just been released the nuclear codes. in the white house, they were scrambling to put toys on the beds for the girls, organizing a scavenger hunt to find their ways around. >> today, after the ceremony, they'll just be going home. it's been their home for the last four years. the president's family getting in
% approval rating. john boehner has an 18% approval rating. the tea party, a 9% approval rating. i wonder what lens they are looking through. >> well i think that's the problem. i think that's the problem with ted cruz's performance yesterday, michael steele because that is not what i think we're going to see down the road road, the new republican party is going to look like. >> i think coming on the heels of the inauguration in the next few weeks, what the american people are looking for is that rodney king moment that little bit of light where we can get along and begin to get things done. i think to joe's point, and to yours, mika yesterday ted cruz was sending out another call taking a different tone and direction than the one the american people are expecting beginning in this atmosphere with the inauguration, the excitement of that. people expect the partisanship to get to the water's edge and stop and begin something fresh. >> by the way, this is not for us -- this is not for the republicans to be nice. >> no exactly. >> this isn't about being nice. this i
inner billie bush. we wanted to see him stammering and blubbering like john boehner leaving production of les miserables. he denied bribing teammates and bribing people and denied doing steroids since 2006. coincidently the last year that the statute of limitations apply. he was lying all over the place. i don't think he helped himself at all last night. i came away liking him less than i did before the interview. >> bill: gutfeld, he has got legal problems all over the place. we talked about this with our is it legal duo earlier in the week. this makes it worse. because he basically is saying, you know, i sued the times of london, for example, he won a judgment. half a million dollars. but i was lying. the story they had was right. and i did it and now people suing him. i think there is a hair person or a masseuse or somebody who said look, he did it, and he went after her, and all of this business. now he loses all of those cases. and if he didn't say anything, at least he would have a chance. >> well, you know what? he only has one option left. and that is to enter politics. clearly
on the fiscal showdown. when he got tough, boehner had to let some republicans go his way. i think he want unity. the path is being tough and being clear about what he wants to get done bp. >> if you look at lift, second terms have not worked out how most presidents think they will work out. something happens. president bush, the financial crisis. president clinton, the impeachment. >> this guy is awesome. >> stuff happens. clean it up. it's family show. george w. bush never mentioned terrorism. that was the topic that dominated his term. i re-eisenhower's second inaugur inaugural. the most important thing was to send troops into little rock. i think most of these presidents have no idea what they're about to encounter. >> outside events end up shaping the legacy and how they respond. the president's maximum political power and validation is right now in this moment and in the next year. the question is does he strike while the iron is hot an does he take to the tendency which will be to appeal to the democratic pass and try to ram something through or do something against his nature and try to
on inaugural ceremonies, chuck schumer, the speaker of the house of representatives, john boehner, house majority leader, eric cantor and house minority leader, nancy pelosi. [ applause ] >> president obama having arrived at the platform, greeting both of his daughters and his wife and mother-in-law. you see behind him, there is vice president biden, chuck schumer, chair of the inaugural committee is the first person we'll hear from and call proceedings to order. and then it unfolds like the greatest graduation ceremony ever. >> rachel, there's a moment when the new president takes over, like when reagan took over from carter, when the chief of secret service walks behind one guy to the other guy, it is pretty creepy. it is pretty creepy when you're the guy losing protection, but nicely enough, it will be the same guy there. >> jerry ford was the first president who upon leaving office from the inauguration of the new president, jimmy carter, decided to leave by helicopter, seen as a rather odd way to leave on the way, but every president has followed that tradition. it is a dramatic way
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)

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